Texts circulation in the city

Source: Author own picture -The Russell footpath project at Streatham

The text language in the city is the most common means of communication used by commerces, authorities or community groups. Texts are used in a form of shop signs, wall paint (old practice), road signs, newspapers or billboards. Those urban surfaces are mediums that circulate information in the city.

The Russell footpath project at Streatham is an example of interactive text board placed in a public place. The message is clearly address to local people as it is in a footpath not visible from the main road.

‘WE WOULD LOVE TO PUT TOGETHER A PROPOSAL FOR HOW WE COULD UTILISE THIS SPACE BEYOND THIS DOOR. ALL SHARE ALL WELCOME’. (message on the board)

This example is characteristic of Kurt Iveson idea of venue of public address. Here you have a communication achieve in space but not in time where you have a message on a board left for passer by to read and write their views later (Iveson, 2007).

 

Source: Author own picture

Source: Author own picture – Example of message left.

The public space available for the proposal  is a small triangle square between the station and a new luxury flat redevelopment (old council building). We can imagine a conterpublic idea where people have a space to share their views and create a sense of public debate as the selling of this council building didn’t have any consultation with Streatham habitants (Fraser,1990 ).

 

References:

Iveson, K. (2007) Publics and the city. Oxford: Blackwell, pp.20-49

Fraser,N. (1990) Rethinking the Public Sphere  A Contribution to the Critique of Actually Existing Democracy. Duke University Press.

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